Popular Exterior Siding Options

Bench on the side of a building

Your home’s siding protects your home from the elements, but it’s also one of the first things people see about your home. If you’re thinking of home improvement, explore the pros and cons of top home siding materials.

Vinyl

Vinyl siding is inexpensive, comes in a range of colors, and goes up quick (which keeps labor costs down). No wonder it’s a top choice for retrofitting older homes. New styles of vinyl mimic more expensive siding options, so you can copy the style of something that may be out of your budget.

While vinyl has many advantages, it isn’t low maintenance. Vinyl can sustain weather damage and develops mildew. You’ll need to clean it frequently or it will look grimy.

Wood

Wood is a classic siding material that lasts decades, provided you do the maintenance. On the downside, wood is pricey and vulnerable to termites.

Fiber Cement

While mimicking the look of expensive materials, fiber cement delivers a low cost, high quality, and fire resistance. While it comes with a 30-year warranty, fiber cement siding usually needs to be refinished after fifteen years on average. Because it’s so heavy, fiber cement takes a long time to install, and comes with high labor costs.

Stucco

A favorite choice in drier regions of the country, such as the Southwest or California, stucco lasts for a long time and delivers a unique, textured look for your home. Stucco is not recommended for wetter climates. Additionally, stucco requires a lengthy installation process with three coats of material, which means you will be looking at a higher labor cost with this siding choice.

Brick

Brick is a classic look that lasts well over time and comes with low maintenance. Brick is naturally resistant to fire, mold, and rot. While brick can be painted, that brings in regular maintenance and costs. Left natural, brick comes in a shallow range of colors. It’s also quite expensive.

Synthetic Stone

Crafted from cement and sand, synthetic stone mimics the look of expensive stones, like granite. It’s usually an accent (say, on a chimney or exterior wall) rather than a full exterior cladding. Synthetic stone is pretty, but it’s not as structurally sound as real stone and it’s expensive to install.

With any home siding, don’t forget to add insulation so you can be energy efficient. Ready for siding replacement or repair? Get a free estimate.